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New Ev Batteries

AriLea

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So, in this article about a new Aluminum Battery..
It would seem to be a little uninteresting when you find the
energy density to be 60% of Li-Ion.
That's how long the battery lasts, your range.
But the power density is 10x.
That's the rate of how much power can dump(or charge) per time period.

That is important, to some people and to some cars too.

If you are making a super-car, or dragster, well, this just out-matched combustion engines.

I know of a racing entity, who drove an s10 pickup. ..look him up..
He stated the only thing limiting him from beating all exotic fuel dragsters..
The amount of power a Li-Ion pack could dump.
Super caps just didn't have the energy density to last the 6 seconds or so..
But these new ones.... hmmmmmm

I think the EV drags will be upping their game.

These also charge 10x faster. So for a partial recharge, this might change
the nature of any EV for short distance driving.
 

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A problem they will have to deal with are the thermal issues. Electrons moving creates heat. Faster they move and the higher the volume the more heat to deal with. Not only does that heat need to be dissipated, it also causes expansion of mechanical items, like batteries. Oh, and that heat is created both during charging and discharging. No easy way around it.
 

AriLea

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A problem they will have to deal with are the thermal issues. Electrons moving creates heat. Faster they move and the higher the volume the more heat to deal with. Not only does that heat need to be dissipated, it also causes expansion of mechanical items, like batteries. Oh, and that heat is created both during charging and discharging. No easy way around it.
They claim lower heat generation.
I have a little electronics and electrical background. (computers + electronics + automotive power=a trifecta?)
(Fun fact: I was a Missile Maintenance Tech back in early 70's. The Titan II missile museum, in Tucson AZ was one I actually worked on. There were once 19 in that area, worked all of them)
The heat is generated by resistance to the electron motion. Or more specifically, it's a measure of the restriction to electron flow. This effect results in some work done, some is usually heat.

So their batteries parasitic internal resistance is apparently lower. Meaning more work goes to chemical changes, and less into heat or other side effects. They also state for the same reason, no cooling required in charging and normal operation.(what ever normal means in this case)

Supercaps don't hardly resist at all, that's why they can dump and charge so fast. No chemical action to provide the resistance.
Supercaps suspend electrons in a capacitive strata, not very dense compared to chemical storage. Chemical uses the energy to transform and oxidize materials(or the reverse). The trick is to have a chemical reaction with lower parasitic resistance for the trouble.

If your chemical change generates heat, that's probably unrecoverable.

Modern high efficiency controllers sometimes avoid the resistance issue by using a interruption method. That is switching on and off fast to moderate the amperage flow. This generates a waveform like an AC, but rather as a pulse and offset to one DC side only(if that makes sense). So there are some losses in the AC-action due to Inductive resistance (called reluctance). And losses due to capacitive bleeding(just my term) And then there is reactance a.k.a. complex impedance. And also, any switching method is of course not perfect.

IF you hair stands up when you get close to a very high power AC line, well that would be experiencing some bleeding.
 

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I think I discovered the real downfall of this aluminum battery. It's not a question of the aluminum but the graphine. It's sort of like silicone chips, the material cost is low but the miniaturization adds to the complexity of manufacturing. They are concentrating on small button batteries as they are small. Scaling up in size for a vehicle may not be feasible until the process can be economically scaled as well. Perhaps in a few years they will develop a simple low-cost process but not holding my breath for this one.
 
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