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Shocking… I told you so.

Made in USA

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This will just spur investment in Zink-Air, Iron-Air, even Aluminum and Redox batteries. Even liquid Metals is in development.

Power-in-road is probably the ultimate future.
If we were really smart we would have developed overhead rail or something, but we aren't that smart(100% technically feasible).

Why?, do you say? it is one tech that can both, respect ground level nature AND is the most efficient at rolling resistance and aerodynamic drag.
(Excluding special aircraft and vacuum tunnels ala Tesla Boring) Also a cheaper road construction method (minus periodic leveling and other adjustments.)
Check out solar roadways. It looks interesting. https://solarroadways.com/
 

AriLea

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Check out solar roadways. It looks interesting. https://solarroadways.com/
I had read about this tech in the past. Nice it's achieving some advancement.

This is an analysis of the payback for a Costco Parking Lot using Solar Roadways at 2018 prices.

It comes out to around 30years, but I think they didn't offset the price of saving 3 installations of asphalt over that same time period, so I say 25 years.
But Solar costs are coming down, and if this were scaled up to all Costco and Walmarts too, half that installed cost would not be unexpected.

I didn't see how they mitigate some issues or pay for maintenance, which would be substantial to keep drainage from plugging up. On those other issues, how would a roadway would survive salting, tire grind or snow plows? ...but parking lots experience a much lower intensity than a public roadway.

What is a crack failure like in comparison to a pot-hole when used in a freeway setting? No mater, overall I like it.

Anyway, I should say you can install solar shades over top of a overhead rail. And this could be used directly to help power coaches riding the rail. Even more, each tower to support it could have a bird-safe windmill on top too. Net balance it would still require power to run the cars. Even so, lot more efficient than using battery storage on-board. There is little reason an overhead rail couldn't be a private enterprise if they could get the permits etc to allow it.

And about being smart, why aren't we required to paint high IR reflective white on all of our roofs at this point? I mean if we are truly worried about global warming and all that. Planting trees that shade over structures will do as well, for multiple reasons. Just say-in.

Aerosols in jet trails will do the same, but this would reduce moisture uptake globally, (photons do actually help knock h2o atoms into the air, imparting enough energy to help vaporize a quantity) not a good thing to interfere with. Aerosol additives are also costly tech in many unexpected levels.
 
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AriLea

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Oh about Mono Rail, it is slightly less ugly that overhead, mostly for the passengers. But, my only objection is, it's harder to put solar shades over it.
Well, also I think it is harder to implement finite levels of switching so they can use small private cars and multiple routes.
Quote from online comments...

The primary reason that monorail proposals have failed in America is because railroad construction planners and road construction planners come into the bidding process and underbid monorail, and then later down the line run into massive construction costs which put the projects way over cost. You don't see this issue happening in other countries where transportation is heavily regulated at the federal level. Many cities are short-sighted when it comes to considering monorail for construction. Los Angeles famously rejected a monorail project from Alweg (who built the Seattle and Disney systems), who offered to build it for free in exchange for revenue, and would then turn it over to the city when the revenue paid off the construction costs. LA decided to build more freeways, and we see how that worked out.

Seattle looked at expanding the monorail there a decade ago, it was rejected in favor of a light rail project which ended up over-budget, tied up the city for years, is not making a profit, and has added to congestion. Las Vegas has a nice monorail, but the company has had to fight with the city for years to get permission to expand, as well as facing never-ending objection from taxi cab companies.

Currently LV Monorail is the only proposed public transportation extension to the new Allegiant Stadium. When you look at the rest of the world, however, you will notice what sets all of them apart from Sydney. That would be integration into the public transportation network. Only in Sydney did the city not do this. They expected that the downtown monorail would be a tourist attraction that would fetch additional tourist revenue. But when buses are 3x cheaper and go to all the same places as the monorail, it was a no-brainer for tourists. Despite calls for it to be re-developed into a connector for downtown employees, no proposal was ever put forward.

Everywhere else, monorail systems tie into public transportation that links to buses, metro trains, light rail, trams, subways, seaports and airports. Almost all of them use the same integrated fare and ticketing systems as the rest of the public transport systems. Further compounding Sydney's issue was the fact that the company which designed it, Von Roll, historically had only worked on amusement park rides and essentially used the same vehicle, which was ill-suited for public transportation. The company eventually went bankrupt and it became impossible to obtain spare parts for when the vehicles prematurely broke down. Public transportation systems in Japan were developed by Mitsubishi and Hitachi. In Korea they were developed by Samsung, in Japan by BYD and CRCC - all licensing Hitachi technology, which itself was developed from Alweg. When you look at the long history of monorail, Sydney is the only city that has ever dismantled its monorail network. Everywhere else it has been built, it has worked, it has been profitable, and it boasts impressive safety records and uptime. To me, that doesn't speak to failure.
 

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The solar roadways have built in heaters so there would be a savings of salt or snow plows. Had to laugh at your white roof comment because I had my roof replaced years ago with insulation and metal that was painted white. Keeps the house much cooler.
 

AriLea

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The solar roadways have built in heaters so there would be a savings of salt or snow plows. Had to laugh at your white roof comment because I had my roof replaced years ago with insulation and metal that was painted white. Keeps the house much cooler.
You know, even gravel is interesting. Compared to asphalt and Portland cement, it insulates from the ground due to the air spaces. So during the day it heats up a lot higher and does evaporate some extra water. But in the middle of the day, that higher temp sends up more IR into space. Then cools off faster after midday. Even the extra evaporation helps to cool it down more than cement.
When things are cooler at night, more of that evaporation comes back down in one form or another.

Also the higher temps focused to a tight time period creates up drafts, bringing that heat closer to outer-space, above much of the CO2, where it is easier to lose heat upward.
 
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