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Rickb

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On average a person drives 39 miles per day. EVs start the day max charged for their use that day, ready to roll. The vast majority of chargie time is at home, overnight, non-peak hours. It takes on average 30 kWh of electricity to power the vehicle 100 miles…….about kWh per day
There is much more involved than what I posted. The energy used to mine, manufacture, deliver, and maintain than to do for oil. The initial cost of EVs is greater than what most people can afford as well. I can tell you, the entire life of my car (TCO, total cost of ownership) is going to be less than the initial cost of an EV.

I'm not against EVs, but I'm a realist when it comes to the cost of them. The big thing coming (especially if you listen to Steven Harris), there are going to be energy shortages (as well as food shortages) coming very soon.
You need the side by side actual cost of both drilling/shipping foreign oil/refining oil and mining to compare the costs. I doubt either one of us has seen that and rely on the general media sources we choose to read and believe. Lots of misinformation out there on both sides, for the average guy to debate. I‘ve read just the opposite Of what you stated above.

TCO comparisons are best for cars in the same vehicle class……sub compacts, compacts, SUV, sedan, pickup, autocycle, motorcycle, etc. The EV I purchased cost slightly less than the comparable ICE I would have purchased. My cost to operate the EV over the past 2 years of ownership is way less than my previous ICE vehicles………lifetime TCO of the car will be a significant personal savings. Note. I read an article written by a rural US postal mail carrier. Bought a Tesla Mole Y years ago to use on his daily route. He said the mileage allowance money he saved in gas and maintenance made his monthly car paymen, charged at home, and enjoyed the Ride for work and personal use. I believe him. I’ve heard people leasing smaller EVs……….money saved on gas made a big dent in the monthly lease payment. I put pencil to paper and I believe him. Lots of media stuff I question since it usually involves the politics of anti electric vehicle and anti-science based sources.

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JEBar

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we installed solar panels on our home back when Jimmy Carter was president .... the only reason we did was the solar install tax credit ..... in the short term it performed OK but as time passed, it proved to be more trouble that it was worth .... one issue we found out about the hard way was the added time, trouble and expense when we had to reshingle our roof .... granted I have no doubt that the technology had some a very long way but our experience left us with no desire to pursue it again
 

Rickb

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we installed solar panels on our home back when Jimmy Carter was president .... the only reason we did was the solar install tax credit ..... in the short term it performed OK but as time passed, it proved to be more trouble that it was worth .... one issue we found out about the hard way was the added time, trouble and expense when we had to reshingle our roof .... granted I have no doubt that the technology had some a very long way but our experience left us with no desire to pursue it again
Based on your experience, I’m happy to be a condo dweller in retirement and don’t have single family home roof………..or I might be compelled to give Solar a try. I do appreciate the increased % of energy that I do use is from renewable sources.
 

Hog

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Getting permits for panels on a roof is quite a nightmare. You need engineering reports for your roof design and the requisite building permits to start. The installers want you to install a new roof prior to the solar installation (you are not allowed to do the installation yourself as every stage of this project is inspected by various agencies as well as the public utilities.) You can start the installation after the new roof is inspected, because removing all the panels, wires, and microinverters is a major job that you never want to do again. Many people go with freestanding racks of panels now to avoid this. Utilities then offer a small buyback, usually at wholesale pricing for kw produced, while selling you marked up retail energy, some dont offer any buyback at all. Even if you cover enough Kw to get "free" electricity, you still lose, as you must pay the "panel charge" to have the meter, which in our area is $68 per meter, and we have two meters. Thats per month, so $136 per month to produce my own electricity and get a small wholesale "credit" against my "energy use", which of course is zero. Utilities have contributed to the lack of adoption through policies that ensure you stay connected and discourage self sufficiency, in many places you must be hooked to a utility to even get a C/O.
 
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