• Welcome to Elio Owners! Join today, registration is easy!

    You can register using your Google, Facebook, or Twitter account, just click here.

Is The Cam Drive Belt Or Chain?

McBrew

Elio Addict
Joined
Feb 6, 2015
Messages
225
Reaction score
520
Location
Annapolis, MD
The free valve system is pretty cool, but as you know, Elio is keep my away from new technology for now.

My FIAT has an interesting valve system, too - "multi-air". There is a camshaft, but it just pressurizes engine oil, and then actuators can send that pressurized oil to the valves to open them. It can open the intake valves later, close them earlier, or open them more than once per intake stroke.

I'll even include a link!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Fredio

Elio Fan
Joined
Sep 4, 2016
Messages
5
Reaction score
4
Location
Ceciltucky, MD
Actually, a chain costs almost the same to change... both have tensioners and you have to take the front end off either motor. Now, if you mean that chains don't have to be changed as often, you are probably correct. I find both to be rather simple to change once you have the front pulley and cover off.

No, no, no, no, no! An overhead cam chain is far less costly to replace if you are smart and careful. There is no reason to remove the timing case. Simply use the old chain to pull the new chain through. Split the old chain at a convenient location such as the camshaft pulley, placing rags to prevent loose links and such from falling into the engine. Attach the new chain to the trailing link of the old chain with the new master link. Turn the engine slowly with a wrench on the crankshaft (do not use the starter!), as a helper guides the new chain in. When the leading link of the new chain comes all the way around, remove the old chain completely and use the new master link to join the two new ends. Turn the engine through several times with the wrench to make sure there is no interference, check the timing and you're done! Of course this only works if the old chain is intact. If not, removing the timing case is the least of the problems. Also, chain tensioners are usually hydraulic, not spring loaded like belt tensioners. They rarely require replacement and typically don't require removal of the timing case either if they do. This is from many years of experience as a MB tech. Now you know why I much prefer timing chains to the failed timing belt experiment of the '90s! I really hope Elio Motors doesn't go cheap here.
 
Last edited:

W. WIllie

Elio Addict
Joined
Nov 16, 2014
Messages
1,699
Reaction score
1,901
Location
Campo Ca.
Wait...I don't think I've ever seen a "linked" timing chain. On ALL chains the weakest point is the "master link".
Got a link somewhere for your information.
 

skygazer6033

Elio Addict
Joined
Jul 6, 2014
Messages
683
Reaction score
2,224
Location
Splendora, Tx
IIRC the reason MB timing chains have a master link is because MB recommends replacement of the chains at a specific interval. As low as 100k on some engines. There are also special tools that install over the cam sprockets to keep the chain from jumping the teeth as it is pulled through with no tension on it. Fredio is correct that this by far the easiest way to replace the chain if you have the special tools. If not it requires the diligence and patience of those who disarm bombs for a living.
 

Ty

Elio Addict
Joined
Feb 28, 2014
Messages
6,331
Reaction score
14,775
Location
Papillion, NE
No, no, no, no, no! An overhead cam chain is far less costly to replace if you are smart and careful. There is no reason to remove the timing case. Simply use the old chain to pull the new chain through. Split the old chain at a convenient location such as the camshaft pulley, placing rags to prevent loose links and such from falling into the engine. Attach the new chain to the trailing link of the old chain with the new master link. Turn the engine slowly with a wrench on the crankshaft (do not use the starter!), as a helper guides the new chain in. When the leading link of the new chain comes all the way around, remove the old chain completely and use the new master link to join the two new ends. Turn the engine through several times with the wrench to make sure there is no interference, check the timing and you're done! Of course this only works if the old chain is intact. If not, removing the timing case is the least of the problems. Also, chain tensioners are usually hydraulic, not spring loaded like belt tensioners. They rarely require replacement and typically don't require removal of the timing case either if they do. This is from many years of experience as a MB tech. Now you know why I much prefer timing chains to the failed timing belt experiment of the '90s! I really hope Elio Motors doesn't go cheap here.
Every chain I replaced had a spring tensioner and required removal of the front timing cover.
 

Ty

Elio Addict
Joined
Feb 28, 2014
Messages
6,331
Reaction score
14,775
Location
Papillion, NE
Every chain I replaced had a spring tensioner and required removal of the front timing cover.
I have to admit though... I didn't think about removing links. I've always put them on from the front but that's because of the tensioner more than anything else.
 
Top Bottom