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Is The Cam Drive Belt Or Chain?

W. WIllie

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That one I totally agree with.
Plus the carb was not insulated good from the heat of the exhaust headers and engine so it would "perqulate".sp, (like the old fashioned coffee pots)
 

Coss

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That one I totally agree with.
Plus the carb was not insulated good from the heat of the exhaust headers and engine so it would "perqulate".sp, (like the old fashioned coffee pots)
And how did you fix it if you were on the road with no parts, tools or ice? Wooden Clothes pins.
You clip the pins on the fuel lines, and they would act like a heat sink. I used to have to do this on my 1942 Harley on really hot days. I'd store them up, under the seat.
 

W. WIllie

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Yep that worked for me once. I also used a 5 gallon jerry can siting on the dash of my motorhome (cover off-lots of heat in the summer) as a fuel tank that used gravity flow for the carb. so i could drive about 100 miles to get a fuel pump.
(Redneck Engineering temp.)
 

Benny

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No, no, no, no, no! An overhead cam chain is far less costly to replace if you are smart and careful. There is no reason to remove the timing case. Simply use the old chain to pull the new chain through. Split the old chain at a convenient location such as the camshaft pulley, placing rags to prevent loose links and such from falling into the engine. Attach the new chain to the trailing link of the old chain with the new master link. Turn the engine slowly with a wrench on the crankshaft (do not use the starter!), as a helper guides the new chain in. When the leading link of the new chain comes all the way around, remove the old chain completely and use the new master link to join the two new ends. Turn the engine through several times with the wrench to make sure there is no interference, check the timing and you're done! Of course this only works if the old chain is intact. If not, removing the timing case is the least of the problems. Also, chain tensioners are usually hydraulic, not spring loaded like belt tensioners. They rarely require replacement and typically don't require removal of the timing case either if they do. This is from many years of experience as a MB tech. Now you know why I much prefer timing chains to the failed timing belt experiment of the '90s! I really hope Elio Motors doesn't go cheap here.

Except it's hard to reset the auto tensioner without removing the front cover.

Belts can be better. I had a Volvo, and I changed the belt in less than 20 minutes.
 

Benny

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I haven't seen a sprocket worn enough to replace in the timing chain type. After all they are OIL BATH.
Chains stretch.


Dont know if they stretch, but I know the rollers wear, and that will change the length of the chain.

I wore the large sprocket on my Toyota motor.
 

Coss

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Except it's hard to reset the auto tensioner without removing the front cover.

Belts can be better. I had a Volvo, and I changed the belt in less than 20 minutes.
This is just a personal question, if it's an Auto Tensioner, why do you have to reset it? It an AUTOMATIC tensioner (aka spring loaded) so shouldn't it reset on it's own? It just didn't sound right to me, sorry.
 

Ty

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This is just a personal question, if it's an Auto Tensioner, why do you have to reset it? It an AUTOMATIC tensioner (aka spring loaded) so shouldn't it reset on it's own? It just didn't sound right to me, sorry.
Lol... It springs out to tension the chain as it lengthens... a new chain will be shorter so the tensioner has to be reset. Oh, I just realized the reason for your confusion. They are on a ratchet spring so the tensioner can extend but can't go back in without being reset. It keeps the chain from just pushing the tensioner out of the way.
 

Coss

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Lol... It springs out to tension the chain as it lengthens... a new chain will be shorter so the tensioner has to be reset. Oh, I just realized the reason for your confusion. They are on a ratchet spring so the tensioner can extend but can't go back in without being reset. It keeps the chain from just pushing the tensioner out of the way.
I've changed the cam chains on the Lotus's many times and never had to go through that is why I asked (Note The Louts 16 valve 1600cc 4 Cylinder engine is dual overhead cams)
 

WilliamH

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Been a while since I messed with timing chains, but when I replaced the chain I had to replace the shoe on the tensioner. 1957 Austin Healey 100-6.
 
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